A small foot for a Yeti, a giant step for mankind

Over the years, American animated films taught us priceless pieces of wisdom.

You are what you choose to be – The Iron Giant, Lilo and Stitch, Wreck it Ralph, Monsters Inc., Zootopia

Live, don’t hide– Finding Nemo, The Croods, Toy Story 2 and 3

Follow your dream, wherever it may lead – Tangled, Ratatouille, Moana

You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you’ll get what you need – The Princess and the Frog

The second born is unfit to reign thus primogeniture is right – The Lion King

Dress to impress – Cinderella

But never before a big budget animated movie aimed at kids dared to teach us to quit religion and dig science. Enter Smallfoot, a hybrid between King Kong and Shymalan’s The Village. Continue reading “A small foot for a Yeti, a giant step for mankind”

Summer recipe: Incredibles 2. How to transform a brilliant story into a warmed-up Disney superhero movie

Try it at home with the film of your choice and change it into the perfect Disney summer tentpole.

Difficulty: **

Expense: *****

Originality: *

Calories: *****

Ingredients: superheroes, but it works with anything, really. Try it with intergalactic conflicts.

Directions: take a film and make it again. No need of a new plot, just make it bigger, louder, more colorful, more crowded, more repetitive. To spice things up, put a girl at the centre of it. Your audience will love it and ask for more… Or not?

Here the detailed instructions.

Continue reading “Summer recipe: Incredibles 2. How to transform a brilliant story into a warmed-up Disney superhero movie”

The power of love. Ode to Back to the Future (NOT the typical teenage celebrity crush).

The first time I fell in love was not with someone I ever met.

I was 11 year old when, on a Sunday night, I went to the cinema and saw Back To The Future. It was a revelation. It captured me like only Raiders Of The Lost Ark did a few years before. But now I was a teenager and there was something more in my excitement: it was love. I fell over heels for Michael J. Fox. Or so I thought at the time. Continue reading “The power of love. Ode to Back to the Future (NOT the typical teenage celebrity crush).”

Bombol Comedy Club #5: filming the kids. Capture the moment!

The set up

For Bombol social media campaign, I wrote and directed 12 stand-up comedy clips about the craziness of parenthood. All comedy routines shot in a white studio reminiscent of the one of the famous Apple vs pc ads. Comedians and audience to be filmed separately. And did I mention the audience was made of kids?

The kids sat in their comfy bouncers in a white room, a clown entertaining them for two and half hours with jokes, tricks and props. We filmed Continue reading “Bombol Comedy Club #5: filming the kids. Capture the moment!”

Take Shelter (spoiler alert!)

In the film’s final scene, the protagonist’s wife acknowledges she was wrong all along and he was right. Never mind the apocalyptic storm coming and their imminent death, for men all over the world that is a happy ending.

I can’t get no satisfaction: lament of the frustrated moviegoer

Lately, I can’t get much satisfaction from Hollywood films. And I mean big, fat, Oscar contenders films.

I read the reviews, I enter the movie theatre with great expectations, I come out disappointed. There’s more: I feel guilty for making my husband go through such pain. I assure him that friends and critics loved it and it looked like a safe bet. I come back home angry and incredulous, wondering how can I be the only one disliking so much films that seem to please everyone else. Didn’t they notice the lack of character development, the misogynist clichés, uninspired direction, stiff acting, out of focus close shots, poor audio quality, plot holes…? I go to IMDB to find like-minded opinions, I express my disappointment leaving a 4 star rating on the film page, I snark at the 10 stars reviews and read only the ones that start with “Two hours of my life I will never get back” and “I opened an account just to write this negative review”. But that only makes me angrier. I change my rating to 3 stars. I realize, once again, that I take films, maybe life, too seriously.

Then I save the night with a good TV series. And the magic happens. Continue reading “I can’t get no satisfaction: lament of the frustrated moviegoer”

Big themes, long shots, short-sighted script: how The Revenant’s journey in the wild left so much unexplored

Here the first part of my review

The frontier, the man versus the wilderness, the fight with the bear, the confrontation with the Other, the heart of darkness, the revenge: on paper The Revenant is the quintessential American film. And an ambitious one: shot all on impervious locations with natural light, long uncut plans and challenging ensemble sequences. Plus it stars the indefatigable Leonardo DiCaprio, who’s in a good streak of memorable performances since, well, forever.

For all those reasons I really wanted to fall in love with Alejandro Gonzales Iñárritu‘s las effort, but I couldn’t. There had been many sparkles along the way but it didn’t last: by the end of our hero’s odyssey in the wild my excitement had already worn off. What went wrong? Continue reading “Big themes, long shots, short-sighted script: how The Revenant’s journey in the wild left so much unexplored”

Macho filmmaking, technical prodigies, photogenic pain: how the bear attack sequence in The Revenant epitomizes the entire movie

And the Oscar for the most detailed man-mauled-by-grizzly sequence goes to… The Revenant! Applause. Next, Ryan Gosling getting hit by a truck, a four minutes uninterrupted take of pure cinematic pleasure.

Oh, it was just a bad dream… Continue reading “Macho filmmaking, technical prodigies, photogenic pain: how the bear attack sequence in The Revenant epitomizes the entire movie”

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